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Denmark to review court cases because of possible DNA flaw


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Denmark to review court cases because of possible DNA flaw

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Some 3,450 criminal cases where a court ruling was chiefly based on DNA evidence will be reviewed, Denmark’s top prosecutor said Monday after a retest showed that a person convicted of burglarly likely was innocent.“We are protectively looking if to see if there are other, similar cases,” Director of Public Prosecutions Jan…

Denmark to review court cases because of possible DNA flaw

COPENHAGEN, Denmark– Some 3,450 criminal cases where a court judgment was primarily based on DNA evidence will be examined, Denmark’s leading district attorney said Monday after a retest revealed that a person convicted of burglarly likely was innocent.

” We are protectively looking if to see if there are other, similar cases,” Director of Public Prosecutions Jan Reckendorff stated. The cases to be examined are those considering that October 2011.

Officials stated the issue happened because the system used to evaluate DNA taken from an individual is various from the one used to evaluate a criminal activity scene. As an outcome, they could not be dependably compared.

Authorities discovered a case where an individual was convicted of break-in, using DNA, to name a few things, as proof. A later analysis showed that the founded guilty person was probably innocent, Reckendorff said in a declaration.

He stated it was not possible to forecast when last choices can be made in all the cases, nor did he state which cases need to be reviewed.

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Forensics can use DNA from blood, semen, skin, saliva or hair discovered at a crime scene to determine the matching DNA of a person.

Previously there have been issues in Denmark about smart phone data being utilized as evidence. Flaws in systems that convert phone companies’ raw data into evidence utilized to position an individual at a criminal activity scene and unreliable cell phone tracking information have actually resulted in lots of lawsuit being delayed.

Danish authorities’ momentarily halted use of mobile phone data in criminal cases and purchased the review of some 10,000 decisions because of mistakes in tracking data.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights booked. This material might not be published, broadcast, reworded or redistributed without consent.

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